HiSS Winter Fair for Research Policy & Practice 2019

We will be hosting an event to bring third sector, industry, government and healthcare organisations together with staff and students in the School of Health in Social Science. Join us for a fun and interactive fair, which aims to connect organisations doing work that may be of interest to staff and students.

Attendees will have the opportunity to list what they are looking for (e.g. volunteer work/internships, making research, policy/practice connections), and will be able to link with organisations in their area of interest.

Tea, coffee, cake, and international snacks will be provided. Table tennis, Bollywood dancing, crafting, competitions, prize draws and other fun games will be on offer.

Get Involved 

We are looking for individuals and/or groups to host stalls under the following categories:

 Third Sector

 Industry

 Government

 Healthcare

 Research projects

 Research Centres

 Teaching/Educational Offerings

Please contact Jillian.Manner@ed.ac.uk by Monday November 25 if you would like to take part by having a stall at the fair or you are a staff or student and would like to assist us with this event.

If you are interested in simply attending, please SIGN UP HERE.

Follow @scphrp on twitter, and use the hashtag #HiSSWinterEvent for updates!

We look forward to seeing you there!

Professor Ruth Jepson, Director of Research 

Dr. Stella Chan, Deputy Director of Research, Knowledge Exchange and Impact 

The SCPHRP Team

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Promoting Transportation Safety in Adolescence

Summary

The application will address the leading cause of death for adolescents, motor vehicle crashes. Evidence is emerging that comprehensive parenting programs and on-road driver assessment and feedback can optimize the learner’s permit period and possibly reduce crashes. The current best-practice policy approach to teen driver MVC prevention are state-level Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs; however, GDL’s success has come from its focus on restricting access to high risk contexts and not on directly improving novice adolescent drivers’ competence. While additional public health benefit can be obtained by directly addressing this issue, existing training programs and models have not been successful. Therefore, there is a critical unmet need for novel efficacious interventions that target young drivers’ inexperience directly to complement the strong and policy-level structure put in place by GDL. The current application addresses this need.

In the proposed study we will evaluate a comprehensive program that consists of both parent- and teen-directed components. For teens, there is a state-of-the art on-road driver assessment (ODA).  For parents, there are face-to-face parent sessions with a trained facilitator and learning-to-drive handbook. These are designed to improve parent engagement across a wide range of parenting behaviors related to the learner and intermediate periods of GDL. This comprehensive parent-teen intervention (PTI) improves on existing programs by jointly targeting both parents and teens and utilizes data from R03HD082664 that indicates the ODA reduces crash risk by an estimated 53%.

Objective

Our Team is conducting a randomized controlled trial with 1,200 parent-teen dyads to evaluate our central hypothesis, which is that the comprehensive parent- and teen-directed intervention administered during the learner period of GDL can reduce the proportion of adolescent drivers who are in a motor vehicle crash (MVC) during the first 12 months of licensure compared to a usual practice control condition.

Funder

US National Institutes of Health

Timeline

Sept 1, 2018 – June 30, 2023

Partners

Dr. Catherine C. McDonald, University of Pennsylvania: https://www.nursing.upenn.edu/live/profiles/26-catherine-c-mcdonald

For further information about this project please contact Dr Jessica Hafetz at jessica.hafetz@ed.ac.uk

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A Report on key outcomes following the implementation of 20mph speed limits in the City of Edinburgh

REPORT: A Report on key outcomes following the implementation of 20mph speed limits in the City of Edinburgh

Dr. Glenna Nightingale and Professor Ruth Jepson on behalf of the NIHR 20mph evaluation project team
October 28th , 2019

This report is prepared by the “Is twenty plenty for health?” project team, based at the University of Edinburgh and several other Universities around the UK.  The project team is conducting an evaluation of the public health impact of the 20mph speed limit policies in Edinburgh and Belfast (results not reported here). This project is funded by the NIHR and final results will not be available until after August 2020.

The aim of this interim report is to provide an overview of changes in vehicle speed and volume and road traffic collision rates resulting in personal injury before and after the implementation of the 20mph speed limits in Edinburgh.

Further analyses will include the use of time series and spatio-temporal models for assessing the trend (temporal and spatial) of road traffic collisions in the City of Edinburgh.

Read the report here…

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