FREE WEBINAR: Introducing the New Meta-ethnography Reporting Guidance

Monday 22nd May 2017 11am-12MD (UK time)

Introducing the New Meta-ethnography Reporting Guidance: What it is & How to use it.

This online session introduces the new meta-ethnography reporting guidance produced by the 2 year NIHR funded eMERGE project. The session provides an overview of why this reporting guidance is needed, what format it takes and how to use it.

On the day: Use this link to attend: http://bit.ly/2oBj5Kv (Note: It is advisable to enter the webinar 5-10 minutes early and you need Java installed. Any technical issues – please email isabelle.uny@stir.ac.uk)

Open to all this free seminar is especially useful for those conducting, reviewing or supervising meta-ethnographies and/or using meta-ethnography findings e.g. journal editors, guideline developers, health technology assessors, representatives of patient groups.

FLYER

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April Bulletin 2017

Welcome to our SCPHRP monthly update – April 2017

news

  • SCPHRP magazine: Spring edition

Front cover for webThe Spring edition of our magazine is now available (http://www.scphrp.ac.uk/spring-magazine-2017/).

In this edition of the magazine we are shining a spotlight on public health work in Scotland that focuses on mental health.

Please check it out!

 

  • Call for contributions to our Summer edition call for summer

We will soon be planning our Summer magazine, and would again like to invite contributions from researchers, policy makers and practitioners.  If you are interested in writing something for us, please contact Samantha.Bain@ed.ac.uk or John.McAteer@ed.ac.uk.

 

  • Publications

Stead, M., Parkes, T., Nicoll, A., Wilson, S., Burgess, C., Eadie, D., Fitzgerald, N., McKell, J., Reid, G., Jepson, R., McAteer, J., Bauld, L. (2017).  Delivery of alcohol brief interventions in community-based youth work settings: exploring feasibility and acceptability in a qualitative study, BMC Public Health, 17, 357.

Belford, M., Robertson, T., Jepson, R. (2017).  Using evaluability assessment to assess local community development health programmes: a Scottish case-study. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 17, 70.

 

  • Other news 

congrats …to Louise Marryat on the birth of her beautiful baby girl Sophie!

 


SCPHRP’s vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with – and used by – key decision-makers.

If you would like to join our mailing list – go to www.scphrp.ac.uk

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Spring magazine 2017

Welcome to the Spring edition of the SCPHRP magazine. In this edition of the magazine we are shining a spotlight on public health work in Scotland that focuses on mental health. We would appreciate any feedback you have on what you like or what we could improve. If you have any, please send it to Sam at samantha.bain@ed.ac.uk. Thanks

 

NOTE: We recommend using browsers other than Firefox, as some funtions do not appear in this browser. If you are unable to access the magazine, there is a pdf version here

 

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March Bulletin 2017

Welcome to our SCPHRP monthly update – March 2017 news


Health Benefits of Community Gardening cover2

DIGGING INTO THE PERCEIVED HEALTH BENEFITS OF COMMUNITY GARDENING

A Secondary Qualitative Analysis by Christina Katan In collaboration with Trellis

A community garden is a piece of land that is cultivated by members of a community. These gardens are gaining popularity in the UK, especially in areas of deprivation. With recent publications on the evidence of gardens and improved health in the UK, community gardening is gaining momentum as a feasible option to improve the health on a population level. With the rising prevalence of chronic disease, complex interventions like community gardening can holistically improve both physical and mental health. Recent evidence suggests that, while we understand that community gardens are good for one’s health for a number of reasons, the mechanisms that create change for these health impacts are poorly understood. Poor understanding of these links makes both the development and evaluation of community gardening difficult for researchers, service providers, and policy makers.  Read more

 

20mph PROJECT

Ruth Jepson from SCPRHP has recently been awarded a National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) 20 milegrant to evaluate the 20mph speed limits in Edinburgh and Belfast. The grant is undertaken in collaboration with colleagues from Physical Activity for Health Research Centre (PAHRC) here in the University of Edinburgh, along with colleagues from Queen’s University Belfast, University of Oxford, University of Cambridge and Sustrans. More information about the study can be found here http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN10200526

As part of the study we are recruiting a post doctoral research fellow for 3.5 years.  More details here http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AYB723/research-fellow/ – we would be grateful if you could circulate this job advert to your networks.

 

PhD STUDENTSHIP

In partnership with Paths for All, Dr Ailsa Niven and SCPHRP’s Ruth Jepson were successful in securing an ESRC Scottish Graduate School of Social Sciences Collaborative PhD Studentship.The project will undertake a realist review of the Paths for All Workplace Step Count Challenge, and will build on an on-going collaborative relationship with Paths for All. Feedback from the panel reported that ‘This is an excellent proposal with a very strong supervisory team and collaborating partner fit’. The studentship will be advertised in due course with an expected start date in October 2017.

 

RCPE Symposium: PUBLIC HEALTH IN A CHANGING WORLD

Wednesday 31 May 2017 at  Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, 9 Queen Street, Edinburgh, EH2 1JQ

This symposium features top international speakers with an exciting programme on: 
International public health:  what can we learn from recent global epidemics and how do we prepare for the next? / European public health: what are the impacts of political destabilisation, economic instability and migration?  / Scottish public health: why do we have excess mortality in the West of Scotland? What should Scotland do to become the healthiest nation in Europe/ How we can effect change: via social media, leadership and other tools

To book or find out more about the event please contact Margaret Farquhar at  m.farquhar@rcpe.ac.uk

 

sign posts

Opportunity:  SCPHRP VISITING EXPERT

We are currently accepting applications from local stakeholders in the Third Sector and community groups, professional public health positions, and public sector health policy fields, for the non-remunerated position of SCPHRP Visiting Expert.   This is a part-time position (perhaps one-half to one-day monthly), the function of which is to work with SCPHRP staff and Fellows on applied research, and/or knowledge-exchange project(s) of mutual interest, bringing diverse “real-world” expertise relevant to our mandate.  The post-holder will gain experience working at the interface between policy, research and practice, and will contribute to a project in their field of interest.  For further information on the role and application process, please visit: http://www.scphrp.ac.uk/opportunity-scphrp-visiting-expert

 

SCPHRP Development Awards

We are currently accepting applications to our funding scheme for third sector and policy/practice Working Group members. This is part of our ongoing commitment to enhance the capacity of the Scottish public health workforce to contribute to, and utilise research, via appropriate career development opportunities. Applicants can seek funding for a number of career development activities, including:

  • Attendance at a relevant conference, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Attendance at a relevant seminar/workshop, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Further education opportunities, including relevant modules/courses.
  • Travel to meet with a key figure in a related field, where such a meeting is likely to benefit your work.

Applications will be accepted throughout the year, until all available monies (£5,000 per working group) have been allocated. To register as a member of any of the working groups, please visit: http://www.scphrp.ac.uk/join-a-working-group/ and contact the relevant Working Group Fellow for further information.


SCPHRP’s vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with – and used by – key decision-makers.

If you would like to join our mailing list – go to www.scphrp.ac.uk

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Digging into the Perceived Health Benefits of Community Gardening

Health Benefits of Community Gardening coverA Secondary Qualitative Analysis by Christina Katan In collaboration with Trellis

A community garden is a piece of land that is cultivated by members of a community. These gardens are gaining popularity in the UK, especially in areas of deprivation. With recent publications on the evidence of gardens and improved health in the UK, community gardening is gaining momentum as a feasible option to improve the health on a population level. With the rising prevalence of chronic disease, complex interventions like community gardening can holistically improve both physical and mental health. Recent evidence suggests that, while we understand that community gardens are good for one’s health for a number of reasons, the mechanisms that create change for these health impacts are poorly understood. Poor understanding of these links makes both the development and evaluation of community gardening difficult for researchers, service providers, and policy makers.

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February Bulletin 2017

newsWelcome to our SCPHRP monthly update – February 2017

 


NEW APPOINTMENT at SCPHRP

hannahHannah Biggs – Research Assistant in Public Health Evaluation

Hannah has over 10 years of public health research, development, facilitation and support experience with expertise in mental health. Prior to joining SCPHRP in 2017, Hannah worked in a range of research, development and facilitation roles including working as a Researcher at the Mental Health Foundation and the Scottish Development Centre for Mental Health and in support roles at ASH Scotland and the Scottish Government. Read more..

 

Opportunity:  SCPHRP Visiting Expert

We are currently accepting applications from local stakeholders in the Third Sector and community groups, professional public health positions, and public sector health policy fields, for the non-remunerated position of SCPHRP Visiting Expert.   This is a part-time position (perhaps one-half to one-day monthly), the function of which is to work with SCPHRP staff and Fellows on applied research, and/or knowledge-exchange project(s) of mutual interest, bringing diverse “real-world” expertise relevant to our mandate.  The post-holder will gain experience working at the interface between policy, research and practice, and will contribute to a project in their field of interest.  For further information on the role and application process, please visit: http://www.scphrp.ac.uk/opportunity-scphrp-visiting-expert/

PrintSCPHRP Development Awards

We are currently accepting applications to our funding scheme for third sector and policy/practice Working Group members. This is part of our ongoing commitment to enhance the capacity of the Scottish public health workforce to contribute to, and utilise research, via appropriate career development opportunities. Applicants can seek funding for a number of career development activities, including:

  • Attendance at a relevant conference, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Attendance at a relevant seminar/workshop, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Further education opportunities, including relevant modules/courses.
  • Travel to meet with a key figure in a related field, where such a meeting is likely to benefit your work.

Applications will be accepted throughout the year, until all available monies (£5,000 per working group) have been allocated. To register as a member of any of the working groups, please visit: http://www.scphrp.ac.uk/join-a-working-group/ and contact the relevant Working Group Fellow for further information.

 

Eat well front coverEvaluation of Eat Well Keep Active (Stage 2)

This evaluation was carried out as part of a larger outcomes evaluation of the Eat Well – Keep Active course run by CHANGES.

Stage 2 followed on from Stage 1 (Robertson 2013) and was a prospective evaluation of people taking part in two consecutive Courses in November 2013 and June 2014.

Using the results and insights gained from Stage 1, the aim of Stage 2 was to determine better whether the Course outcomes (see Appendix 1) were met and to estimate the size of effects which might be attributable to the course. It used a cross-sectional approach to measure short and longer terms effects. The objectives were to: determine

  • the size of effects seen in Stage 1
  • determine whether these effects were maintained over the longer term
  • determine which effects are maintained over the longer term and which are not.

You can view the report here at Eat Well – Keep Active

 

Diabetes UK studentship award

Ruth Jepson and Alison Kirk from Strathclyde have been successful in obtaining a Diabetes UK studentship award to develop a physical activity intervention for women with gestational diabetes.

 

SCPHRP’s vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with – and used by – key decision-makers.

If you would like to join our mailing list – go to www.scphrp.ac.uk

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Evaluation of Eat Well Keep Active (Stage 2)

Eat well front coverThis evaluation was carried out as part of a larger outcomes evaluation of the Eat Well – Keep Active course run by CHANGES.

Stage 2 followed on from Stage 1 (Robertson 2013) and was a prospective evaluation of people taking part in two consecutive Courses in November 2013 and June 2014.

Using the results and insights gained from Stage 1, the aim of Stage 2 was to determine better whether the Course outcomes (see Appendix 1) were met and to estimate the size of effects which might be attributable to the course. It used a cross-sectional approach to measure short and longer terms effects. The objectives were to: determine

  • the size of effects seen in Stage 1
  • determine whether these effects were maintained over the longer term
  • determine which effects are maintained over the longer term and which are not.

We would like to thank all the Eat Well – Keep Active Course attendees who completed our questionnaires. We would also like to thank Health Scotland for funding this evaluation and Heather Cameron at CHANGES Community Health Project, Musselburgh for her unfailing enthusiasm, support and encouragement.

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Health Impacts of Mixed-Tenure Housing Regeneration in Toronto’s Regent Park

 

JIMIn early 2016, Jim Dunn, Professor and Chair of the Department of Health, Aging and Society at McMaster University, came to Edinburgh to give a talk on the Health Impacts of Mixed-Tenure Housing Regeneration in Toronto’s Regent Park. The seminar was well received and a copy of the slides can be found here. More information about the Regent Park Social Housing Redevelopment Project is available online at https://crunch.mcmaster.ca/projects/regent-park-revitalization

Jim is also a scientist at the Centre for Research on Inner City Health at St Michael’s Hospital in Toronto and Director of the McMaster Institute for Healthier Environments and holds adjunct appointments at the University of Toronto (Geography and Planning) and the University of Waterloo (Planning).

You can contact Jim at jim.dunn@mcmaster.ca or via twitter @UrbanHealthProf

 

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CALL FOR ENTRIES: SPRING magazine 2017

We are currently planning our Spring magazine, and would again like to invite contributions from researchers, policy makers and practitioners.

We would particularly welcome contributions related to the topic of mental health, but we would welcome contributions in other areas also. If you are interested in writing something for us, please contact Samantha.Bain@ed.ac.uk or John.McAteer@ed.ac.uk.

DEADLINE FRIDAY 3 MARCH

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January Bulletin 2017

Welcome to our SCPHRP monthly update – January 2017

Dr Yvonne LairdNew appointments

Dr Yvonne Laird has joined us to work on projects related to our adolescence work stream.  She has recently finished her PhD looking at the effect of social support on physical activity in adolescent girls and is coming to us from PAHRC (Physical Activity for Health Research Centre) here at Edinburgh.

Read more..

 

call for

CALL FOR ENTRIES. We are currently planning our Spring magazine, and would again like to invite contributions from researchers, policy makers and practitioners.  We would particularly welcome contributions related to the topic of mental health, but we would welcome contributions in other areas also.  If you are interested in writing something for us, please contact Samantha.Bain@ed.ac.uk or John.McAteer@ed.ac.ukDEADLINE FRIDAY 3 MARCH

 

Opportunity:  SCPHRP Visiting Expert

We are currently accepting applications from local stakeholders in the Third Sector and community groups, professional public health positions, and public sector health policy fields, for the non-remunerated position of SCPHRP Visiting Expert.   This is a part-time position (perhaps one-half to one-day monthly), the function of which is to work with SCPHRP staff and Fellows on applied research, and/or knowledge-exchange project(s) of mutual interest, bringing diverse “real-world” expertise relevant to our mandate.  The post-holder will gain experience working at the interface between policy, research and practice, and will contribute to a project in their field of interest.  For further information on the role and application process, please visit: SCPHRP Visiting Expert

SCPHRP Development Awards

COGSWe are currently accepting applications to our funding scheme for third sector and policy/practice Working Group members. This is part of our ongoing commitment to enhance the capacity of the Scottish public health workforce to contribute to, and utilise research, via appropriate career development opportunities. Applicants can seek funding for a number of career development activities, including:

  • Attendance at a relevant conference, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Attendance at a relevant seminar/workshop, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Further education opportunities, including relevant modules/courses.
  • Travel to meet with a key figure in a related field, where such a meeting is likely to benefit your work.

Applications will be accepted throughout the year, until all available monies (£5,000 per working group) have been allocated. To register as a member of any of the working groups, please visit: http://www.scphrp.ac.uk/join-a-working-group/ and contact the relevant Working Group Fellow for further information.

Research report Tackling the School Run.

It sets out the importance of combining the provision of safe infrastructure with activities that support cycling and walking in increasing levels of active travel to school. It is a piece of research conducted for Transport Scotland with Sustrans R&MU working as part of a wider consortium. Our particular contribution was to analyse the Hands-Up Scotland survey data in the context of where interventions have been delivered. There is a really important message about joined-up delivery being worth ‘more than the sum of the parts’ at the heart of this – I hope that you can make use of that evidence.

You can find more information on my blog post here:
http://www.sustrans.org.uk/blog/are-we-getting-school-run-right-children-and-young-people

Statistics of Brexit.

The annual conference of the Radical Statistics Group and this year is on the topic of the Statistics of Brexit. http://www.radstats.org.uk/conference/Edinburgh2017/

SCPHRP logo2

SCPHRP’s vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with – and used by – key decision-makers.

If you would like to join our mailing list – go to www.scphrp.ac.uk

Share