Focus group participants wanted!

Are you a first year student?

Do you think you are physically active for less than 2.5 hours per week?

Would you like a £15 Love2Shop voucher and lunch in return for sharing your experiences?

We are looking for first year students to take part in a focus group discussion (60 to 90 minutes) about your experiences of coming to university. The focus groups will be a chance to have your experiences represented and put forward your ideas for how universities could support you to be more active. Lunch will be provided and everyone who takes part in a focus group discussion will be given a £15 Love2Shop voucher as a thank you.

If you are interested in taking part or finding out more, please contact Yvonne.Laird@ed.ac.uk.

 

Share

Experimentarium: Our Outdoors – How Healthy are Public Outdoor Spaces?

Summerhall (Mainhall) 9th – 13th April 11am-4pm

Come and see us at Summerhall this Easter as we take part in the 30th Edinburgh International Science Festival (EISF). We are running a drop-in event as part of the festival’s Experimentarium about how the outdoor environments we spend time in can impact our health. Come along and take part in hand’s on and interactive activities suitable for all ages. Read more…

@OurOutdoorsUK

Share

Adolescents and health-related behaviour: using a framework to develop interventions to support positive behaviours

Adolescents and health-related behaviour: using a framework to develop interventions to support positive behaviours

Jan Pringle, Lawrence Doi, Divya Jindal-Snape, Ruth Jepson and John McAteer

Abstract

Background:

Experimentation is a natural part of adolescent maturation. In conjunction with increased exposure tobehaviours such as alcohol or substance use, and the potentially intensified influence of peer groups, unhealthybehaviour patterns may develop as part of this experimentation. However, the adolescent years also provide considerableopportunity for behaviour to be shaped in positive ways that may improve immediate and longer term health outcomes. A systematic review carried out by the authors concluded that physiological changes during adolescence need to beconsidered when designing or implementing interventions, due to their influence on health behaviours. The aim of the study is to demonstrate how the six steps in quality intervention development (6SQuID) framework can be used, inconjunction with research or review findings, to inform the development of pilot or feasibility studies. Using thesynthesised findings from our adolescent systematic review, we sought to illustrate how adolescent interventionsmightbedesignedtotargetspecifichealthbehaviours and augment positive adolescent health outcomes.

Methods:

We applied the 6SQuID framework to the findings from a review of adolescent physiological influences onhealth behaviour. This involved following the process defined within 6SQuID and applying the sequential steps to build aproposed pilot study, based on the pre-defined findings of our systematic review. We used the Social Learning Theory toassist in identifying how and why change can be influenced, with and for adolescents.

Results:

We devised a pilot study example, targeting teaching assistants, to illustrate how the detailed steps within the6SQuID framework can assist the development and subsequent implementation of adolescent interventions that arelikely to be effective.

Conclusions:

This paper gives details of how the 6SQuID framework can be used for intervention development, usingspecific research findings, across a variety of adolescent health behaviours. This example provides details of how tooperationalise 6SQuID in practical terms that are transferrable to other populations and situations. In this respect, weanticipate that this illustrative case may be of use in the design, development, and implementation of a wide variety ofinterventions

Share

March Bulletin 2018

 

Hello and welcome to our March bulletin. Bringing you our usual mix of news, publications, project updates and much much more.

 

 

News: Changes within SCPHRP from 1st July 2018

Some of you may be aware that the SCPHRP core MRC and CSO funding ceases in its present form at the end of June 2018.  We are delighted to formally announce that SCPHRP will continue to function as a Research Centre from 1st July 2018, within the School of Health in Social Sciences.  Dr Ruth Jepson will be taking over as Director, with Dr John McAteer as Deputy Director.  Professor John Frank will step down from his Director role within SCPHRP to focus upon other projects, largely in Global Health Research, and his new role as Director of Knowledge Exchange and Research Impact within the Usher Institute.  We will continue to develop research activity in collaboration with our existing academic and non-academic partners.  We are looking forward to this new chapter and the exciting opportunities that it will bring!

 

 

Goodbye Jenny

Congratulations to Jenny Ordoñez Betancourth who has gone home to Colombia to have her baby.  We wish her and her new family all the best from everyone at SCPHRP.

 

Our Outdoors

Come and see SCPHRP at Summerhall this Easter as we take part in the 30th Edinburgh International Science Festival (EISF). We are running a drop-in event as part of the festival’s Experimentarium about how the outdoor environments we spend time in can impact our health. Come along and take part in hand’s on and interactive activities suitable for all ages.

 Summerhall  (Mainhall) 9th – 13th April @ 11am-4pm

 

 

Paths for All: Building a Programme Theory

On Tuesday 13th March our PhD student, Mary Allison, worked with Paths for All staff to begin building a programme theory for the Step Count Challenge.  In addition to it providing 2 hours worth of great data, it was also 2 hours of a ‘standing workshop’.  Walking the talk on healthy research and evaluation practice!

 

Cost of the School Day

SCPHRP’s Greig Inglis is currently working with colleagues from Health Scotland to conduct an evaluability assessment of the Cost of the School Day project. This project is being delivered by Child Poverty Action Group, and involves children, parents and school staff in identifying cost barriers to fully participating and in taking action to remove them.

Please contact Greig (greig.inglis@ed.ac.uk) for more information about the evaluability assessment. More information about the Cost of the School Day can be found here: http://www.cpag.org.uk/cost-school-day

Research the Headlines

SCPHRP’s Louise Marryat was one of twenty Early Career Researchers from across the UK and beyond who were invited to attend an event to discuss Mental health policy and social science in Edinburgh on Thursday 23rd March.

The day was funded by a British Academy Rising Star Award receivedby the Usher Institute’s own Dr. Martyn Pickersgill. The morning session comprised some great discussions with Dr. Sinead Rhodes (University of Edinburgh) and Chris O’Sullivan (Mental Health Foundation) around public engagement and mental health, including how popular portrayals of mental health, such as Stacy’s postpartum psychosis storyline in EastEnders, which was developed with advice from experts, can positively influence public perceptions of mental health, as well as how to get involved in writing blogs such as ‘research the headlines’ https://researchtheheadlines.org/.

 

Public Health Research Programme Rapid Funding Scheme

Application dates: 01 March 2018 to 31 December 2018

The Rapid Funding Scheme (RFS) offers researchers the opportunity to apply for funds to conduct rapid baseline data collection, as well as other feasibility work, prior to intervention implementation, for time-limited opportunities such as a natural experiment or similar evaluations of a new public health intervention. Read more…

 

20 MPH

Have you seen a 20mph sign in your town, village or city? What did you think? Did it prompt you to drive more slowly? These are exactly the questions that a new research project is trying to assess. In this blog, G.F.Nightingale, P. Kelly, and the “Is twenty plenty?” research team discuss the major study they have embarked on to evaluate the effects of the 20mph speed limit implementations in Edinburgh and Belfast.

 

Rethinking Healthy Spaces: Evidence, Evaluation and Design

Kathleen Morrison attended a workshop at the University of Bristol earlier this month which was led by a diverse range of academics from the GW4 Alliance which is a collaboration between the University of Bath, the University of Bristol, Cardiff University and the University of Exeter.

The workshop brought together perspectives from different subject areas in an attempt to develop a better understanding of how spaces are designed to be healthy, and how collaborative approaches can enhance spatial design for health. The workshop explored the role of evidence and how we can look to build interdisciplinary research networks on the topic.

 

And finally…

 Thank you for taking the time to read our latest bulletin. We’re always keen to hear from you too – so get in touch if you’d like to share your news, views and comments. In the meantime, it’s bye from all of us at SCPHRP, until next time. You can always find out more about SCPHRP via our website www.SCPHRP.ac.uk and follow us on twitter @scphrp
 If you’d like to keep up to date with our news, projects, videos, events and publications join our mailing list.

In the meantime, it’s bye from all of us at SCPHRP, until next time.

Share

UPDATE: The ‘Healthy University of the Future’ hackathon

In partnership with University Sport and Exercise and the Physical Activity for Health Research Centre (PAHRC), SCPHRP ran an event during the Festival of Creative Learning to get students to think about health in the university setting and to design solutions to health challenges facing students.

Two teams of students worked on diverse health topics. One team focused on provision of affordable, convenient and healthy food options and the other team focused on targeting computer-related health. Both teams delivered excellent presentations in front of a panel of university and national leaders in public health and student wellbeing and prizes were awarded for innovation, potential for implementation, team work, and quality of presentation.

For further information about the event please email Yvonne Laird at yvonne.laird@ed.ac.uk

A hackathon is a timed competition-style event where teams are expected to get creative and work collaboratively and come up with a design or idea.

 

Share

February Bulletin 2018

Hello and welcome to our February bulletin. Bringing you our usual mix of news, publications, project updates and much much more.

 

SCPHRPs trip to New Zealand & Oz

Ruth Jepson and John McAteer recently returned from New Zealand and Australia. They were sharing the work of SCPHRP during a number of invited talks at Massey University, University of Auckland, Victoria University of Wellington (NZ), in addition to La Trobe University, and Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

These talks focused upon public health intervention development and evaluation using the 6SQuID framework, evaluability assessments, and Ruth’s NIHR funded 20MPH evaluation.  Ruth also presented on the latter topic to the New Zealand National Transport Agency, where there is a huge deal of interest in the approach taken by Ruth’s Team in Scotland.

A number of international connections were made during this trip, and Ruth and John are looking forward to following these up.

 

Using record linkage to improve physical health in people with mental illness

On Monday 19th February SCPHRP’s Hannah Biggs and Laura Tirman attended the seminar “Using record linkage to improve physical health in people with mental illness”. The Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Gregor Smith chaired the day with presentations from:

  • Caroline Jackson and Kelly Fleetwood from the University of Edinburgh
  • Robert Pearsall and Daniel Smith from the University of Glasgow
  • Gillian Gunn from the Long Term Conditions Unit at the Scottish Government
  • Moira Connolly from NHS GG&C
  • Francis Simpson from Support in Mind

Academia, NHS, public sector and voluntary sector were all represented in the audience.

 

Our Outdoors – How Healthy are Public Outdoors Spaces?

On 7th February Sam Bain and Hannah Biggs attended the programme launch of the Edinburgh International Science Festival. In 2018 the festival is celebrating its 30th year.

The theme of this year’s festival is “Life the Universe and Everything”. SCPHRP will be hosting a drop-in event as part of the festival’s Experimentarium at Summerhall from
Monday 9th to Friday 13th April, 11am – 4pm.

Please come along and take part in “Our Outdoors – How Healthy are Public Outdoors Spaces?” (we’re on page 25 of the programme). For further information please contact Sam Bain or Hannah Biggs

 

The Gathering

On 21st February our PhD student, Mary Allison, attended ‘The Gathering’ to share some early insights and information about her Realist Evaluation of the Step Count Challenge.

The whole event, the largest free gathering of third sector organisations in the UK, got into the spirit of step counting with the entrance doors to the SECC proudly advertising a one day step count challenge.

 

Healthy University of the Future hackathon

In partnership with University Sport and Exercise and the Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, SCPHRP ran an event during the Festival of Creative Learning to get students to think about health in the university setting and to design solutions to health challenges facing students.

Two teams of students worked on diverse health topics. One team focused on provision of affordable, convenient and healthy food options and the other team focused on targeting computer-related health.

Both teams delivered excellent presentations in front of a panel of university and national leaders in public health and student wellbeing and prizes were awarded for innovation, potential for implementation, team work, and quality of presentation. For further information, please contact Yvonne Laird

 

How to Undertake a Systematic Review (2 day course)

SCPHRPs Ruth Jepson will be running a two day course in ‘How to Undertake a Systematic Review organised by Edinburgh WTCRF, Education Programme on Monday 19th March and Tuesday 20th March.

About the Course

Day 1. An introduction to systematic reviews 
The day will include the following topics:
What are systematic reviews and why are they important?
Different types of systematic reviews (e.g. of qualitative and quantitative studies). Building blocks of a systematic review
The day will be a mix of lectures (knowledge building) and group work (skill building) 

Day 2. Analysing studies for a systematic review 
Morning session: analysing quantitative studies (randomised controlled trials) (non-experimental designs are not included in this course)
Afternoon session: analysis of qualitative studies (e.g. focus group and interview studies). The aim of this session is to introduce two of the main analytical techniques used in synthesising qualitative studies (thematic analysis and meta-ethnography). Both are relatively technical so this will be an overview session rather than providing every skill needed to perform such an analysis. However, participants will have an opportunity to undertake a thematic analysis.

For further information and to book a place, please go to Clinical Research Training Scotland

 

Visiting Expert Dr Jonathan Sher

Dr Jonathan Sher joins us at SCPHRP as a visiting expert and will be working with John Frank and Larry Doi.

The first half of Jonathan’s long career focused on rural education and community development. He led two international projects as a member of OECD’s Secretariat and held a variety of academic posts, including as Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies at North Carolina State University.

 

Chief Scientist Visit

The Chief Scientist (CSO)  Professor David Crossman visited SCPHRP on the 9th February.  SCPHRP is funded by the CSO and the Medical Research Council (MRC), therefore this was a great opportunity to share and discuss some of the learnings from our work.

PUBLICATION

A grounded theory of how social support influences physical activity in adolescent girls

Yvonne Laird, Samantha Fawkner & Ailsa Niven (2018) A
grounded theory of how social support influences physical activity in adolescent girls, International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 13:1, 1435099, DOI: 10.1080/17482631.2018.1435099

 

6th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference 18th – 19th June, 2018
 Leeds, UK

The 6th Annual International Weight Stigma Conference is being held in Leeds, UK on 18-19 June, 2018. Abstracts are now being accepted for oral presentations and posters, as well as session proposals including brief symposia, round tables, debates, workshops and non-traditional submissions (e.g. media, performance, art).

For more information about the conference, please visit: stigmaconference.com

 

And finally…

Thank you for taking the time to read our latest bulletin. We’re always keen to hear from you too – so get in touch if you’d like to share your news, views and comments. You can always find out more about SCPHRP via our website www.SCPHRP.ac.uk and follow us on twitter @scphrp

Join our mailing list

If you’d like to keep up to date with our news, projects, videos, events and publications join our mailing list.

 

In the meantime, it’s bye from all of us at SCPHRP, until next time.

Share

‘How to Undertake a Systematic Review’ (2 day course)

SCPHRPs Dr Ruth Jepson will be running a two day course ‘How to Undertake a Systematic Review organised by Edinburgh WTCRF, Education Programme on Monday 19th March and Tuesday 20th March.

Day 1. An introduction to systematic reviews

The day will include the following topics:
What are systematic reviews and why are they important?
Different types of systematic reviews (e.g. of qualitative and quantitative studies)
Building blocks of a systematic review
i) how to develop a review question
ii) how to develop inclusion and exclusion criteria
iii) how to develop a search strategy
iv) applying inclusion and exclusion criteria
v) quality appraisal
vi) data extraction and recording processes

The day will be a mix of lectures (knowledge building) and group work (skill building)

 

Day 2. Analysing studies for a systematic review

Morning:

Analysing quantitative studies (randomised controlled trials) [non-experimental designs are not included in this course]
This is a basic level course, and not intended to give in-depth statistical advice or teaching. It is more of an overview of the range of techniques, and when to use them.
Introduction to analytical methods for quantitative experimental studies (i.e. RCTs, quasi-RCTs, controlled studies)
Understanding and dealing with heterogeneity
Meta-analysis
Subgroup analysis
Narrative analysis
Drawing conclusions
Making recommendations for research and practice.

 

Afternoon session:

Analysis of qualitative studies (e.g. focus group and interview studies)
The aim of this session is to introduce two of the main analytical techniques used in synthesising qualitative studies (thematic analysis and meta-ethnography). Both are relatively technical so this will be an overview session rather than providing everyskill neeeded to perform such an analysis. However, participants will have an opportunity to undertake a thematic analysis.
Introduction to qualitative synthesis
Thematic synthesis: what is it and how to do it
Meta-ethnography: what it is and how to do it
Quality appraisal of qualitative studies
Drawing conclusions
Making recommendations for research and practice.

 

For further information and to book a place please go to How to Undertake a Systematic Review (2 Day course)

Share

A grounded theory of how social support influences physical activity in adolescent girls

A grounded theory of how social support influences physical activity in adolescent girls

Yvonne Laird (SCPHRP), Samantha Fawkner (Physical Activity for Health Research Centre, University of Edinburgh), Ailsa Niven (Physical Activity for Health Research Centre).

Purpose

Adolescent girls are not sufficiently active to achieve health benefits. Social support from friends and family has been positively associated with physical activity in adolescent girls; however it is unclear how social support influences physical activity behaviour. This study aimed to develop a grounded theory of how social support influences physical activity in adolescent girls.

Methods

A qualitative, constructivist grounded theory approach was adopted. Individual interviews explored adolescent girls’ perspectives of how significant others’ influenced their physical activity through providing social support, and through modelling physical activity.

Results

Participants perceived social support to influence physical activity behaviour through performance improvements, self-efficacy, enjoyment, motivation and by enabling physical activity. Improvements in performance and self-efficacy were also linked to motivation to be active. Girls perceived modelling to influence behaviour through providing opportunities for them to be physically active, and by inspiring them to be active.

Conclusion

The grounded theory outlines adolescent girls’ perceptions of how significant others influence their physical activity and provides a framework for future research examining the role of social support on physical activity.

Share