September bulletin 2017

Welcome to our SCPHRP monthly update – September Bulletin 2017

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  • Welcome to our new PhD students

Mary Allison is co-supervised by Ailsa Niven (PAHRC) and SCPHRPs Ruth Jepson and will be undertaking a PhD on Workplace Step Count Challenges.

Mary’s on twitter @MaryWestview

 

Gosaye Fida is co-supervised by Ruth and Charlotte Clarke (Health in Social Sciences), and will be undertaking a PhD around the National Diabetes Prevention Programme.

 

 

  • UPDATE from Greig Inglis

On 1st September SCPHRPs Greig presented some early work on public attitudes toward income inequality at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Social Psychology Conference in Leicester. The title of the presentation was “Causal attributions of poverty and wealth both predict support for income redistribution in the UK.”

Last week Greig was invited to contribute to a day-long session on social justice for undergraduate students in Education. He delivered four workshops throughout the day to trainee teachers on child poverty, health inequalities and education. The sessions were well received and generated a lot of interest amongst the students. He’ll be following up on this work with some more activities in the future, including a full lecture to Education students in the new year.

  • UPDATE from Jan Pringle

SCPHRP’s systematic reviewer Jan has been invited to present a poster at the Public Health Science conference in London on 24th Nov. The poster will highlight a review of early learning and childcare, carried out with colleagues from NHS Health Scotland, as part of the PHEN collaboration (Public Health Evidence Network). The particular focus of the review was on parental outcomes, and the conference will be an excellent forum to showcase the collaboration. The study abstract will be published in the Lancet around the same time as the conference

Jan also had the adolescent sexual behaviour paper published last month in Cogent Social Sciences. The title is: The physiology of adolescent sexual behaviour: a systematic review.

  • UPDATE from Audrey Buelo

Audrey, SCPHRPs new PhD student, attended the European Respiratory Society Congress in Milan in mid-September to present the results of a systematic review she conducted last fall with the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research.

The project, supervised by Professor Hilary Pinnock, was a systematic review of risk factors associated with asthma attacks in children with asthma. The abstract was one of seven abstracts allocated to an oral presentation, out of over 90 abstracts submitted for the Primary Care session at the conference. Audrey presented the research to over 300 clinicians and researchers at the session. The talk was very well-received and people were especially interested in the clinical applications of understanding these risk factors.

  • Forest School Project

Girls experiences of Forest School: A qualitative evaluation of the impacts of a Forest School personal development programme for 12-13 year-old girls upon wellbeing, resilience, and community outcomes.

The project has been designed in collaboration with the Nature Unlimited staff, who requested the data collection and study in order to rigorously evaluate their programme and intervention. Adolescent girls who are taking part in the Forest School development program will be interviewed by the primary researcher, Jillian Manner.

 

 

 

  • EVENT: Natural benefits: human-nature relationships in the contemporary world

Have you built a woodland den recently? When was the last time you walked barefoot through the grass? Do you let your children climb trees?

24 October 6.30pm – 8.00pm at George Square Lecture Theatre, The University of Edinburgh, George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LD. Read more and register..

 

  • See Me Scotland PRESS RELEASE

THE HEADS of the Scottish health and social care services have come together for the first time to look at how to tackle mental health stigma and discrimination in the sector.

See Me say that mental health is not treated equally to physical health, which can lead to people experiencing stigma and discrimination, or having mental health needs neglected when experiencing problems with their physical health.

To change this, representatives at the event discussed how to ensure health and social care professionals are equipped to look after the whole person and treat physical and mental health together, providing the parity the Scottish Government aims to achieve in the new Mental Health Strategy.

 

  • CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND

SCPHRP’s Hannah Biggs and Alexandra Blair attended Children in Scotland’s (CIS) Networking Event on September 19, 2017 at Dovecot Studios (Edinburgh). Over the course of the evening, CIS unveiled their new branding and premiered a short film outlining their vision.

 

 

  • CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND Annual Conference 2017 – 8 & 9 Nov at Murryfield Stadium

Children in Scotland annual children’s sector flagship event is a unique opportunity for those who work within the sector to meet, network, learn and debate the key issues facing the sector today.

This year, they’ll be asking – if not you, then who? You’ll have the opportunity to explore, discuss and plan how you can make a positive difference to the lives of the children and young people you work with. Read more and register..

 

 

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The Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP) vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with – and used by – key decision-makers.
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Children in Scotland’s (CIS) Networking Event

SCPHRP at Children in Scotland’s Networking Event (September 19, 2017)

SCPHRP’s Hannah Biggs and Alexandra Blair attended Children in Scotland’s (CIS) Networking Event on September 19, 2017 at Dovecot Studios (Edinburgh). Over the course of the evening, CIS unveiled their new branding and premiered a short film outlining their vision. The event also presented a great opportunity to learn about CIS’ activities through a number of presentation and films about some of the work they have done in partnership. More broadly, the event was an opportunity to learn about the Third Sector’s involvement in advocacy for children’s rights and well-being and the insights from the evening will no doubt contribute to SCPHRP’s work on areas of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), health inequalities, and participatory research design.

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Step Count Challenge

SCPHRP is going for the Autumn Step Count challenge for the first time! The Step Count Challenge aims to get people more active through walking more in our day-to-day lives.

We’ll give an update once we get going!

Exercise & Physical Activity

Research has shown that exercise not only provides a reduction in stress levels but also an increased ability to resist it’s effects in the future. Exercise is your shortest route to a feeling of well-being and a physical glow. Everyone knows that exercise is good for you and that it is one of the best stress combatants available. Any form of physical activity leads to the release of these feel good neurotransmitters called endorphins which are often classified as the happy hormones.

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Introduction to Closer: Longitudinal resources for teaching & research

Introduction to Closer: Longitudinal resources for teaching & research

**PLEASE NOTE THE DATE HAS NOW CHANGED FROM 10 OCTOBER TO 9 OCTOBER

at Practice Suite (1.15), 1st Floor, Chrystal Macmillan Building, University of Edinburgh, George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LD.

This workshop will introduce delegates to CLOSER’s range of longitudinal resources and highlight opportunities for life course and intergenerational research. The session will cover the following:

  • CLOSER Learning Hub demonstration
  • CLOSER Discovery demonstration
  • CLOSER’s work on data harmonisation and linkage

The workshop is suitable for researchers from across disciplines and career stages who are using data currently or considering using data from the CLOSER longitudinal studies.

CLOSER Learning Hub demonstration
The first part of this session will introduce the CLOSER Learning Hub, a new online teaching resource aimed at a non-expert and interdisciplinary audience.

CLOSER Discovery demonstration
www.discovery.closer.ac.uk
The second part of this session will be a demonstration of CLOSER Discovery, an innovative new search engine that enables researchers to explore the content of eight leading UK longitudinal studies. It is the most detailed and sophisticated search tool of its kind.

Harmonising and linking data
In addition to making longitudinal data more discoverable, CLOSER is working to enhance the data for research purposes. It has focused on harmonising commonly used measures within and across studies, as well as facilitating linkage of study data to administrative records. This short session will provide a brief overview of CLOSER’s work in these areas, including forthcoming harmonised datasets to be deposited at the UK Data Service, and current and planned linkages.

For further information, please contact Jennie Blows (j.blows@ucl.ac.uk).

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Forest School Project

Nature Unlimited provides Forest School based sessions across the Scottish Borders. Forest School and outdoor learning programmes have been shown to play a significant role in improving mental and physical health. Participants take part in weekly sessions run in the Forest School woodland area, where they participate in nature based activities based upon their interests, such as craft, traditional skills, and photography.

This project will contribute to the growing literature on Forest Schools and outdoor learning as a therapeutic method for treating mental health and self-esteem issues. Teenage girls have been shown to being especially likely to experience mental health and self-esteem issues during adolescence. The findings from this study could demonstrate the value of Forest School Programs in reducing the mental health burden in the teenage population and serve as an early intervention strategy to be applied in different contexts. Such interventions hold significant potential to ameliorate the mental health and wellbeing of young people, at a formative and impressionable age. It will particularly focus on examining the three main aims of Nature Unlimited; well-being, resilience, and community, factors likely to have a long-term effect on the young people following the programme.

The study has been designed in collaboration with the Nature Unlimited staff, who requested the data collection and study in order to rigorously evaluate their programme and intervention. Adolescent girls who are taking part in the Forest School development program will be interviewed by the primary researcher, Jillian Manner. SCPHRPs Larry DoiRuth Jepson and Yvonne Laird are also involved with the study.

Nature Unlimited Website:

http://www.natureunlimited.scot/

Nature Unlimited Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/natureunlimitedscotland/

 

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LANDSCAPE REVIEW OF OBESITY RESEARCH IN SCOTLAND: AN UPDATE

IN 2015 SCPHRP members Ruth Jepson, Michelle Estrade, Stephen Malden and Daryll Archibald carried out a landscape review of current and ongoing obesity research that has been conducted on Scottish populations in the last decade, on behalf of NHS Health Scotland. This research was intended to supplement revisions that were being made to Scotland’s Obesity Route Map. The review has since been updated to include research conducted up to January 2017, with a poster being presented at the 24th European Congress on Obesity in Porto, Portugal in May 2017.

Obesity System Map

Updated findings lead to much of the same conclusions that were drawn from the original review in 2015. Specifically, a substantial amount of observational/epidemiological research has been conducted in Scotland, indicating that there is an active research community that is monitoring trends in obesity and its associated factors. Most interventions focus on treating obesity in people who are already overweight/obese as opposed to preventing obesity amongst the general population. A number of interventions seem to focus only on one particular cause and pathway to obesity (such as diet or physical activity) instead of taking the various other causes and pathways to obesity into consideration. A useful resource that some readers may find interesting is the Foresight Obesity Systems Map. This resource demonstrates the various complex causes and pathways related to obesity that should be considered when developing interventions.

Lastly, there are currently no macro-level obesity interventions being implemented or evaluated in Scotland, which is likely due to the complexities of designing, implementing and evaluating such initiatives. Interventions in Scotland address obesity across the lifecourse from childhood to the elderly, however most interventions focus primarily on working-age adults and children. We at SCPHRP plan to continue to update this small piece of research every couple of years in the hope that it will be useful for researchers and practitioners who are interested in keeping track of what is happening in Scotland with regards to obesity research.

For further information please contact Stephen.Malden@ed.ac.uk

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SCPHRP Summer eMag 2017

Welcome to the Summer edition of the SCPHRP magazine, our second edition of 2017

We have had a busy 2017 so far at SCPHRP, we’ve said hello to a whole load of new people and said goodbye to a few. In this edition of the magazine we are sharing updates on some of the exciting projects we’ve been working on including our Citizen Science project, the 20mph Research Study, an Obesity Landscape project, and our Stand Up for Health project (which comes with a creative video from film-maker Felix Adamson). Hope you enjoy.

We would appreciate any feedback you have on what you like or what we could improve. If you have any, please send it to Sam at samantha.bain@ed.ac.uk. Thanks

 

NOTE: We recommend using browsers other than Firefox, as some funtions do not appear in this browser. If you are unable to access the magazine, there is a pdf version here

 

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European Respiratory Society Conference, Milan

SCPHRPs Audrey Buelo will be attending the European Respiratory Society Conference in Milan from 9 – 12th September, where she will be giving an oral presentation on her research conducted last fall with the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research. The conference is the largest meeting of respiratory professionals in the world, and Audrey will be presenting the results of a systematic review of risk factors for asthma attacks in children 5-12 during the Primary Care section of the conference. This project was led by Hilary Pinnock (Professor of Primary Care Respiratory Medicine) and Audrey worked in a team of researchers from across the UK.

Contact Audrey at Audrey.Buelo@ed.ac.uk

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August Bulletin 2017

Welcome to our SCPHRP monthly update – August Bulletin 2017

 

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  • CONGRATULATIONS!

 

To SCPHRPs Michelle Estrade who has just had a baby boy, Felipe Alfredo Estrade was born precisely on his due date, with a few minutes to spare before midnight – just as organised as Michelle.

 

  • EVENT: Introduction to CLOSER: Longitudinal resources for teaching and research

Tuesday 10th October, 10am

Professor Alison Park (University College London), Teviot Lecture Theatre (Doorway 5). Jointly hosted SCPHRP/Usher event

CLOSER’s mission is to maximise the use, value and impact of the UK’s longitudinal studies, both at home and abroad.  Bringing together eight leading cohort and longitudinal studies, the British Library and the UK Data Service, CLOSER works to stimulate interdisciplinary research, develop shared resources, provide training, and share expertise.  The purpose of this workshop is to flag resources developed to help users of the CLOSER longitudinal studies.  This workshop is for researchers from across disciplines and career stages who are using data currently or considering using data from the CLOSER longitudinal studies.

Find out more about CLOSER here 

  • STAND UP FOR HEALTH

The Stand Up for Health intervention has been developed and tested within the Ipsos MORI call centre in Leith. The researchers conducted qualitative focus groups and facilitated a workshop to understand the needs and context of the call centre. Based on the qualitative data, activities to reduce sedentary behaviour were developed to target four levels of the call centre: individual, social/cultural, environmental, and organisational levels. READ MORE

 

 

SCPHRP commissioned a video to be created at Ipsos Mori in Leith, with support from staff at both the call centre and SCPHRP. The filmmaker is Felix Adamson (http://www.felixadamson.com). WATCH HERE

 

  • The SCPHRP & PAHRC 20mph project

The SCPHRP and PAHRC 20mph project team embarked on a four-day survey from 10th -13th August, 2017.  The aim of the survey was to capture the public perception of the planned implementation of 20mph speed limits in zones 4 and 5 by the City of Edinburgh Council.  The survey questions ranged from general knowledge on the 20mph programme to drivers’ attitudes towards the proposed 20mph speed limit.  As a follow-up, this project seeks to measure public perception after implementation of the speed limit.  The results from the survey will be analysed (together with supplementary data from other sources) to accurately portray the impact of the 20mph speed limits in Edinburgh. Read more about the project here

  • Meta-ethnography then and now (G. Noblit)

George W. Noblit is the Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He, with Dwight Hare, developed meta-ethnography. He had occasionally written more about it and has consulted on several large qualitative synthesis projects

Watch a short film of George providing a brief overview of meta-ethnography and highlights some contemporary issues relevant HERE

 

 

  • PUBLICATIONS

1. Doi L, Wason D,  Malden S, Jepson D (2017) A Realist Evaluation of the Refocused School Nurse Programme within Early Adopter Sites in Scotland. Scottish Government, Edinburgh. http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2017/07/2706/0

2. Doi L, Jepson R, Hardie S (2017) Realist evaluation of an enhanced health visiting programme. PLoS ONE 12(7): e0180569. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180569

3. Jan Pringle, Kathryn L. Mills, John McAteer, Ruth Jepson, Emma Hogg, Neil Anand & Sarah-Jayne Blakemore | John Martyn Chamberlain (Reviewing Editor). The physiology of adolescent sexual behaviour: A systematic review

4. New BMJ article by some of us at SCPHRP, and a team of Swedish collaborators, finds Scottish middle-aged women to be MUCH less health than their Swedish counterparts, even after adjusting for the higher education of the latter Two tales of cardiovascular risks—middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study http://bmjopen.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/bmjopen-2017-016527?ijkey=4oP5RXAa0m0yPKf&keytype=ref

5. Goodfellow, A., Frank, J., McAteer, J., Rankin, J. (2017). Improving preconception health and care: a situation analysis. BMC Health Services Research, 17, 595 (see here: https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12913-017-2544-1)

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SUBSCRIBE TO SCPHRP and keep up to date with all our projects, publications, videos, magazines, bulletins and more.

JOIN US HERE

 

The Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP) vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with – and used by – key decision-makers.
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20 MPH study project

A new 20 MPH study project will examine the impact of 20mph speed limits on safety and public health. Rates of traffic accidents and injuries before and after the change will be measured to look at whether road safety has been enhanced. Any change in transport use will also be scrutinised by examining the take-up of cycling and walking. Residents will also be asked their opinions of the move.

The research team, led by the University of Edinburgh and SCPHRP, hopes the project will inform other cities planning to introduce lower speed limits. It is the largest of its kind in the UK and will run until 2020. SCPHRP’s Ruth Jepson said: “We are excited to launch this major project, which we hope will provide very important insights into the public health effects of such initiatives.

The study is funded by the National Institute for Health Research and involves partnership with other UK universities, NHS Health Scotland, and the charity Sustrans. Read more at here

 

Recently, the SCPHRP  and Physical Activity for Health Research Centre (PAHRC) project team embarked on a four-day survey from 10th -13th August, 2017.  The aim of the survey was to capture the public perception of the planned implementation of 20mph speed limits in zones 4 and 5 by the City of Edinburgh Council.  The survey questions ranged from general knowledge on the 20mph programme to drivers’ attitudes towards the proposed 20mph speed limit.  As a follow-up, this project seeks to measure public perception after implementation of the speed limit.  The results from the survey will be analysed (together with supplementary data from other sources) to accurately portray the impact of the 20mph speed limits in Edinburgh.

For further information please contact Kathleen at Kathleen.Morrison@ed.ac.uk

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