Promoting Transportation Safety in Adolescence

Summary

The application will address the leading cause of death for adolescents, motor vehicle crashes. Evidence is emerging that comprehensive parenting programs and on-road driver assessment and feedback can optimize the learner’s permit period and possibly reduce crashes. The current best-practice policy approach to teen driver MVC prevention are state-level Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs; however, GDL’s success has come from its focus on restricting access to high risk contexts and not on directly improving novice adolescent drivers’ competence. While additional public health benefit can be obtained by directly addressing this issue, existing training programs and models have not been successful. Therefore, there is a critical unmet need for novel efficacious interventions that target young drivers’ inexperience directly to complement the strong and policy-level structure put in place by GDL. The current application addresses this need.

In the proposed study we will evaluate a comprehensive program that consists of both parent- and teen-directed components. For teens, there is a state-of-the art on-road driver assessment (ODA).  For parents, there are face-to-face parent sessions with a trained facilitator and learning-to-drive handbook. These are designed to improve parent engagement across a wide range of parenting behaviors related to the learner and intermediate periods of GDL. This comprehensive parent-teen intervention (PTI) improves on existing programs by jointly targeting both parents and teens and utilizes data from R03HD082664 that indicates the ODA reduces crash risk by an estimated 53%.

Objective

Our Team is conducting a randomized controlled trial with 1,200 parent-teen dyads to evaluate our central hypothesis, which is that the comprehensive parent- and teen-directed intervention administered during the learner period of GDL can reduce the proportion of adolescent drivers who are in a motor vehicle crash (MVC) during the first 12 months of licensure compared to a usual practice control condition.

Funder

US National Institutes of Health

Timeline

Sept 1, 2018 – June 30, 2023

Partners

Dr. Catherine C. McDonald, University of Pennsylvania: https://www.nursing.upenn.edu/live/profiles/26-catherine-c-mcdonald

For further information about this project please contact Dr Jessica Hafetz at jessica.hafetz@ed.ac.uk

Our Outdoors Project

Our Outdoors’ is a citizen science project which aims to contribute to public understanding of how shared outdoor spaces can affect our health and wellbeing. The project will also explore whether specific spaces affect people’s health and wellbeing differently and if so, why?

In this project, we need people like you, to get involved and help us learn about a range of local outdoor spaces. From streets and town squares to beaches, public parks and beyond. Any spaces can be included as long as they are outside and freely open to anyone (e.g. not a private garden).

Citizen science is when members of the public like you and your community are involved in conducting scientific research. Most often members of the public (or citizen scientists) work with researchers on a research project.

There are different ways for the public to become involved in citizen science, ranging from:

  • Collecting data (e.g. counting birds in your garden and filling out a survey),
  • Helping to identify topics for research,
  • Analysing the data
  • Feeding back the results to your local community and/or community representatives. 

The Our Outdoors survey

The survey has been designed to capture how various aspects of outdoor spaces affect our health and wellbeing. It has been designed by both public health researchers at the University of Edinburgh and members of the public through a series of workshops and public engagement activities. The survey draws both on existing evidence available in scientific literature as well as the views and experiences of citizens.

Find out more about the project at Ouroutdoors.org.uk

RESOURCES

The About Our Outdoors poster

Findings from Community Workshops

Our Outdoors at the Edinburgh International Science Festival

Science Bus

 

UPDATE: The ‘Healthy University of the Future’ hackathon


In partnership with University Sport and Exercise and the Physical Activity for Health Research Centre (PAHRC), SCPHRP ran an event during the Festival of Creative Learning to get students to think about health in the university setting and to design solutions to health challenges facing students.
Two teams of students worked on diverse health topics. One team focused on provision of affordable, convenient and healthy food options and the other team focused on targeting computer-related health. Both teams delivered excellent presentations in front of a panel of university and national leaders in public health and student wellbeing and prizes were awarded for innovation, potential for implementation, team work, and quality of presentation.
For further information about the event please email Yvonne Laird at yvonne.laird@ed.ac.uk
A hackathon is a timed competition-style event where teams are expected to get creative and work collaboratively and come up with a design or idea.

Latest Projects

Promoting Transportation Safety in Adolescence (November 5, 2019)

Summary The application will address the leading cause of death for adolescents, motor vehicle crashes. Evidence is emerging that comprehensive parenting programs and on-road driver assessment and feedback can optimize the learner’s permit period and possibly reduce crashes. The current best-practice policy approach to teen driver MVC prevention are state-level Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs; […]

Read More


Our Outdoors Project (June 26, 2018)

Our Outdoors’ is a citizen science project which aims to contribute to public understanding of how shared outdoor spaces can affect our health and wellbeing. The project will also explore whether specific spaces affect people’s health and wellbeing differently and if so, why? In this project, we need people like you, to get involved and […]

Read More


UPDATE: The ‘Healthy University of the Future’ hackathon (March 12, 2018)

In partnership with University Sport and Exercise and the Physical Activity for Health Research Centre (PAHRC), SCPHRP ran an event during the Festival of Creative Learning to get students to think about health in the university setting and to design solutions to health challenges facing students. Two teams of students worked on diverse health topics. […]

Read More


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