September bulletin 2017

Welcome to our SCPHRP monthly update – September Bulletin 2017


  • Welcome to our new PhD students

Mary Allison is co-supervised by Ailsa Niven (PAHRC) and SCPHRPs Ruth Jepson and will be undertaking a PhD on Workplace Step Count Challenges.

Mary’s on twitter @MaryWestview


Gosaye Fida is co-supervised by Ruth and Charlotte Clarke (Health in Social Sciences), and will be undertaking a PhD around the National Diabetes Prevention Programme.



  • UPDATE from Greig Inglis

On 1st September SCPHRPs Greig presented some early work on public attitudes toward income inequality at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Social Psychology Conference in Leicester. The title of the presentation was “Causal attributions of poverty and wealth both predict support for income redistribution in the UK.”

Last week Greig was invited to contribute to a day-long session on social justice for undergraduate students in Education. He delivered four workshops throughout the day to trainee teachers on child poverty, health inequalities and education. The sessions were well received and generated a lot of interest amongst the students. He’ll be following up on this work with some more activities in the future, including a full lecture to Education students in the new year.

  • UPDATE from Jan Pringle

SCPHRP’s systematic reviewer Jan has been invited to present a poster at the Public Health Science conference in London on 24th Nov. The poster will highlight a review of early learning and childcare, carried out with colleagues from NHS Health Scotland, as part of the PHEN collaboration (Public Health Evidence Network). The particular focus of the review was on parental outcomes, and the conference will be an excellent forum to showcase the collaboration. The study abstract will be published in the Lancet around the same time as the conference

Jan also had the adolescent sexual behaviour paper published last month in Cogent Social Sciences. The title is: The physiology of adolescent sexual behaviour: a systematic review.

  • UPDATE from Audrey Buelo

Audrey, SCPHRPs new PhD student, attended the European Respiratory Society Congress in Milan in mid-September to present the results of a systematic review she conducted last fall with the Asthma UK Centre for Applied Research.

The project, supervised by Professor Hilary Pinnock, was a systematic review of risk factors associated with asthma attacks in children with asthma. The abstract was one of seven abstracts allocated to an oral presentation, out of over 90 abstracts submitted for the Primary Care session at the conference. Audrey presented the research to over 300 clinicians and researchers at the session. The talk was very well-received and people were especially interested in the clinical applications of understanding these risk factors.

  • Forest School Project

Girls experiences of Forest School: A qualitative evaluation of the impacts of a Forest School personal development programme for 12-13 year-old girls upon wellbeing, resilience, and community outcomes.

The project has been designed in collaboration with the Nature Unlimited staff, who requested the data collection and study in order to rigorously evaluate their programme and intervention. Adolescent girls who are taking part in the Forest School development program will be interviewed by the primary researcher, Jillian Manner.




  • EVENT: Natural benefits: human-nature relationships in the contemporary world

Have you built a woodland den recently? When was the last time you walked barefoot through the grass? Do you let your children climb trees?

24 October 6.30pm – 8.00pm at George Square Lecture Theatre, The University of Edinburgh, George Square, Edinburgh, EH8 9LD. Read more and register..


  • See Me Scotland PRESS RELEASE

THE HEADS of the Scottish health and social care services have come together for the first time to look at how to tackle mental health stigma and discrimination in the sector.

See Me say that mental health is not treated equally to physical health, which can lead to people experiencing stigma and discrimination, or having mental health needs neglected when experiencing problems with their physical health.

To change this, representatives at the event discussed how to ensure health and social care professionals are equipped to look after the whole person and treat physical and mental health together, providing the parity the Scottish Government aims to achieve in the new Mental Health Strategy.



SCPHRP’s Hannah Biggs and Alexandra Blair attended Children in Scotland’s (CIS) Networking Event on September 19, 2017 at Dovecot Studios (Edinburgh). Over the course of the evening, CIS unveiled their new branding and premiered a short film outlining their vision.



  • CHILDREN IN SCOTLAND Annual Conference 2017 – 8 & 9 Nov at Murryfield Stadium

Children in Scotland annual children’s sector flagship event is a unique opportunity for those who work within the sector to meet, network, learn and debate the key issues facing the sector today.

This year, they’ll be asking – if not you, then who? You’ll have the opportunity to explore, discuss and plan how you can make a positive difference to the lives of the children and young people you work with. Read more and register..



SUBSCRIBE TO SCPHRP and keep up to date with all our projects, publications, videos, magazines, bulletins and more.






The Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP) vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with – and used by – key decision-makers.

SCPHRP Summer eMag 2017

Welcome to the Summer edition of the SCPHRP magazine, our second edition of 2017

We have had a busy 2017 so far at SCPHRP, we’ve said hello to a whole load of new people and said goodbye to a few. In this edition of the magazine we are sharing updates on some of the exciting projects we’ve been working on including our Citizen Science project, the 20mph Research Study, an Obesity Landscape project, and our Stand Up for Health project (which comes with a creative video from film-maker Felix Adamson). Hope you enjoy.

We would appreciate any feedback you have on what you like or what we could improve. If you have any, please send it to Sam at Thanks


NOTE: We recommend using browsers other than Firefox, as some funtions do not appear in this browser. If you are unable to access the magazine, there is a pdf version here



SCPHRP Bulletin April 2016

Take 5 Minutes to read about recent developments at the Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP).


care logo FINALDevelopment of an intervention for parents/carers with teenage children, Thursday 26th May, 9.30am-1.30pm, COSLA Conference Centre

This event – a partnership between SCPHRP and the Robertson Trust – presents a piece of work conducted by Jane Hartley and John McAteer to develop an intervention for parents/carers with teenage children. The five-week intervention has been developed for kinship carers in the first instance, with a view to expanding its use for other groups. The event is primarily for third sector groups, and policy makers/decision makers who may be interested in taking the intervention forward in terms of implementation and evaluation. Please visit our Eventbrite page to register (

  • How qualitative (or interpretive or critical) is qualitative synthesis and what we can do about this?

SCPHRP will be hosting a public lecture on 22nd June between 3pm – 5pm (venue in Edinburgh TBC) by George Noblitt who developed the meta synthesis approach for qualitative research in the 1980’s. George has been invited to Scotland to input into a NIHR funded project to develop meta-ethnography guidelines (eMERGe). Stirling University are leading the grant and Ruth Jepson from SCPHRP is a co-investigator. More information will be posted shortly.


GGTWENTWOSCPHRP’s Daryll Archibald has had an abstract accepted to present the findings of his work investigating the health and well-being benefits of attending a Green Gym programme for older people at the World Congress of Active Ageing in Melbourne, Australia this coming June and has been awarded an Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics Travel Grant to attend the conference. Daryll and TCV are currently working on an application to the Big Lottery Fund to increase the scope of the Green Gym project. Well done Daryll! Read more about the Green Gym in the Spring magazine here..



SCPHRP awardsSCPHRP Development Awards

We are currently accepting applications for a new funding scheme for third sector and policy/practice Working Group members. This is part of our on-going commitment to enhance the capacity of the Scottish public health workforce to contribute to, and utilise research, via appropriate career development opportunities. Applicants can seek funding for a number of career development activities, including:

  • Attendance at a relevant conference, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Attendance at a relevant seminar/workshop, including registration, travel and accommodation costs.
  • Further education opportunities, including relevant modules/courses.
  • Travel to meet with a key figure in a related field, where such a meeting is likely to benefit your work.

Applications will be accepted throughout the year, until all available monies (£5,000 per working group) have been allocated. To register as a member of any of the working groups, please visit: and contact the relevant Working Group Fellow for further information.

Mark Hazelwood from the Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care was succesful in applying for a SCPHRP development grant to attend the forthcoming meeting of the International Working Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement (IWG), in Dunblane, 6-11th November. Congratulations Mark.


SCPHRP Spring magazine 2016Our Spring magazine is now on the website here.. Read about COLLABORATING WITH ACADEMICS: An Evidence for Success supplementary guide from Patty Lozano-Casal, Evaluation Support Scotland on Page 9, EVERYDAY LIFE AND OLDER PEOPLE’S WELL-BEING in local town centres in Edinburgh from Luca Brunelli on Page 12 and much more. If you would like to contribute to future magazines, please get in touch with Sam Bain at 

  • Frank, J. (2016). World view: Origins of the obesity pandemic can be analysed. Nature, 532, p149. 
  • Evans, J.M., Ryde, G., Jepson, R., Gray, C., Shepherd, A., Mackison, D., Ireland, A.V., McMurdo, M.E., Williams, B. (2016). Accessing and engaging women from socio-economically disadvantaged areas: a participatory approach to the design of a public health intervention for delivery in a Bingo club, BMC Public Health, 16. Full article accessible here:
  • Best, C., Haseen, F., van der Sluijs, W., Ozakinci, G., Currie, D., Eadie, D., Stead, M., Mackintosh, A.M., Pearce, J., Tisch, C., MacGregor, A., Amos, A., Frank, J., Haw, S. (2016). Relationship between e-cigarette point of sale recall and e-cigarette use in secondary school children: a cross-sectional study, 16. Full article accessible here:

SCPHRP’s vision is to develop Scotland as a leader in public-health intervention research for equitable health improvement through catalysing strong researcher/research-user collaborations that ensure timely, robust, policy relevant research that is created with
– and used by – key decision-makers.
If you would like to join our mailing list – go to


Origins of the obesity pandemic can be analysed

Prof John FrankStatistical and biological methods are available to probe why the prevalence of obesity has risen more in some countries than in others, says John Frank.

What started the obesity pandemic? We remain unsure. And although we do not need to know the answer to tackle the symptoms, a clearer picture might produce better strategies. Analytical methods for sorting out the epidemiological evidence on this question now lie within our reach. Economists have used these methods for many years to look at the impact of large natural experiments such as changes in policy. And in the past five years or so, epidemiologists have realised that they can be applied to health outcomes. Read more..



Seven Key Investments for Health Equity across the Lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK

A new research article from the SCPHRP team, led by Prof. John Frank, has explored the evidence supporting seven potential societal investments (aimed at different stages of the lifecourse) that could help improve health and reduce health inequalities. The research team used hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved their expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales in recent decades.uk5Despite Scotland’s longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty. However, on the following indicators of other ‘best investments for health equity’, Scotland has not achieved demonstrably more equitable outcomes by SEP than the rest of the UK: infant mortality and teenage pregnancy rates; early childhood education implementation; standardised educational attainment after primary/secondary school; healthcare system access and performance; protection of the population from potentially hazardous patterns of food, drink and gambling use; unemployment.


The article is free to access by either clicking the image to the right, or using the link below.


Trauma Conference 2015: Austerity, Poverty and Psychological Trauma

Thursday 28 May 2015, University of Stirling, Stirling

Stirling Campus spring confbanner

The concept of exposure to a traumatic event(s) is now recognised as a contributing factor to the development of a variety of mental health issues. Research supports that major risk factors for mental health issues are poverty, poor education, unemployment, social isolation and adverse life experiences. Living within an environment of deprivation and poverty can increase the exposure and therefore vulnerability to psychological trauma through exposure to traumatic experiences.

To address the treatment and support needs of survivors of trauma within our services requires heightened awareness of the concept, and consequences of ‘Trauma’ across the lifespan.

This conference brings together researchers, clinicians and community action volunteers to share knowledge, insight and experience that address the direct impact on individuals, families and communities exposed to austerity and its consequences. Additionally it will provide a forum for discussion on the future direction of psychological trauma-informed care in our society.

SCPHRP will be running a workshop at the conference under the Public Health theme entitled ‘Generating evidence in public health: A case-study of austerity & health’. For more information about the conference and to register please visit the conference website: Please note registration closes on 14th May 2015.


Open Space on Health Inequalities in Scotland: Emerging Risks and Opportunities for Change


For more information and to register

An open space to discuss what you think health inequalities in Scotland will look like in the next decade and beyond, particularly related to emerging risk factors, health/wellbeing outcomes and potential solutions given the current (and emerging) social and political landscape.

Summary of the event:
This free, one-day Open Space event organised by members of the Adult Life/Working Age Working Group at the Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy (SCPHRP) aims to bring together people from across academia, healthcare, policy and the non-profit/voluntary sector working in Scotland to help identify emerging inequalities in the nation’s health and discuss realistic, yet creative, approaches to addressing these emerging risks. This is not a lecture, seminar or workshop, it’s an Open Space. Essentially, we provide the space, the structure and the sandwiches; you bring the burning questions and the ideas. There are no audience members, just participants.

This event aims to:
• Generate new ideas to help tackle health inequalities in Scotland
• Start to generate new networks who can help research/implement change around these emerging issues/solutions
• Document these ideas to share amongst the group

Following the event, we aim to:
• Produce a short briefing for policymakers and funders explaining where the group thinks health inequalities research should consider focusing in the next decade (in the context of Scotland’s new constitutional powers), and why
• Produce a short report for interested parties about the outcomes from the day
• Produce an academic article considering health inequalities research in the next decade in Scotland
• Organise future meetings/events on specific topics that emerge from the discussions on the day

10:00-10:30 Registration (tea/coffee available)
10:30-10:45 Welcome and introduction to the day (Tony Robertson, SCPHRP)
10:45-12:15 Marketplace of ideas
12:15-12:30 Coffee break
12:30-13:15 Break-out session 1
13:15-14:15 Lunch
14:15-15:00 Break-out session 2
15:00-15:15 Coffee break
15:15-16:00 Break-out session 3
16:00-16:30 Closing

For more information about Open Space and to register